An Introduction to Flood Insurance

nashville flooding An Introduction to Flood Insurance
As parts of Tennessee continue to clean up after massive flooding and spring severe weather causes deluges throughout the country, there’s no time like the present for a brief introduction to flood insurance.
My fiance works as a flood insurance underwriter, so he was full of ideas on how to educate the general public about the complex flood insurance system. First and foremost, all flood insurance is provided by The National Flood Insurance Program, a federal government agency.
Although flood insurance consumers benefit because insurance prices are consistent throughout the country, this also means the NFIP is entirely reliant on Congress’ ability to keep the NFIP active, which is something they’ve struggled with especially during times of heavy legislative activity.
A reauthorization guidance passed on April 16 only extends the NFIP through May 31, so if you feel you may be in need of flood insurance, act now! As long as your application and payment are received by May 31, you’ll receive coverage, even if the NFIP expires. The U.S., Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands are all eligible for NFIP coverage, and unlike other types of insurance, flood insurance agents can write coverage nationally.
For more information about flood insurance, including coverage for homeowners, renters and condo owners, visit Floodsmart.gov. And for a comprehensive look at how to protect your home, including what to do during a flood to minimize damage, revisit this post from the Charles & Hudson archives.
Check FEMA’s flood zone map to determine if you’re in a special flood zone, although most claims are paid out for buildings that are not located in these zones. If you’re not in a special zone, coverage should cost around $400 or less per year, although an authorized agent can give you an exact quote.


Although flood insurance consumers benefit because insurance prices are consistent throughout the country, this also means the NFIP is entirely reliant on Congress’ ability to keep the NFIP active, which is something they’ve struggled with especially during times of heavy legislative activity.
A reauthorization guidance passed on April 16 only extends the NFIP through May 31, so if you feel you may be in need of flood insurance, act now! As long as your application and payment are received by May 31, you’ll receive coverage, even if the NFIP expires. The U.S., Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands are all eligible for NFIP coverage, and unlike other types of insurance, flood insurance agents can write coverage nationally.
For more information about flood insurance, including coverage for homeowners, renters and condo owners, visit Floodsmart.gov. And for a comprehensive look at how to protect your home, including what to do during a flood to minimize damage, revisit this post from the Charles & Hudson archives.
Check FEMA’s flood zone map to determine if you’re in a special flood zone, although most claims are paid out for buildings that are not located in these zones. If you’re not in a special zone, coverage should cost around $400 or less per year, although an authorized agent can give you an exact quote.