Be a Hero, Save a Hero with a Kidde Smoke Alarm

kidde smoke alarm event Be a Hero, Save a Hero with a Kidde Smoke Alarm
The holidays are a great time to keep home safety top of mind. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), between 2005 and 2009, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated annual average of 240 home fires that began with Christmas trees.
To help families protect themselves from the dangers of holiday home fires, The Home Depot is partnering with Kidde – the world’s largest manufacturer of fire safety products – and the NFPA to donate 2,500 Kidde battery-operated smoke alarms powered by 10-year Lithium Ion batteries to a local fire department on Saturday, December 1.
The local donation is part of a nationwide giveaway of $1 million worth of smoke alarms, or 50,000 units, and the “Be a Hero, Save a Hero” initiative taking place at Home Depot stores across the country that same day.
Local fire department officials will be on-hand to accept the donation at your local Home Depot store from 10-12 p.m. on December 1. Event activities include:
+ Donation ceremony for 2,500 smoke alarms to a local fire department at 11 a.m.
+ Smoke alarm maintenance tips and fire escape plans from The Home Depot and Kidde experts
+ Kids workshop at 10 a.m.
+ Opportunity for children to write thank you letters for their local firefighters
+ Kidde will share information on their Be a Hero, Save a Hero campaign
Make sure you call to confirm the event will be held at your local Home Depot. We’ll be attending this event at the Home Depot in Inglewood this weekend and hope you do to.

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timothy dahl profile Be a Hero, Save a Hero with a Kidde Smoke Alarm

Timothy Dahl

Founder/EIC at Charles & Hudson
Timothy’s background includes stints at This Old House, ELLE DECOR, Metropolitan Home and Woman’s Day. His work has been published on Wired Design, Bob Vila, DIY Network, The Family Handyman and Popular Mechanics and he has been featured on the Martha Stewart radio show and as a speaker at the ALT Design Summit, K/BIS and the National Hardware Show.
timothy dahl profile Be a Hero, Save a Hero with a Kidde Smoke Alarm

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  • http://blog.diyshutters.com/ Jewel

    thanks for this post – I was beginning to think the electrician installed the outlets in my house upside down with the ground on top because the couple 4 watt night lights I use are designed to plug in with the ground on the bottom to be right side up. bottoms up!

    • Fred

      I too was wondering about this. Many night lights / etc, are designed to be plugged in ground-down. Even though ground-up may make more sense, many products simple don’t work when they are reversed.

  • http://omnivorousfish.com Joe Fish

    I have to respectfully disagree, and I admit to having been annoyed at this trend in recent years. Grounded plugs generally have more insular heft around the ground pin, making the “bottom” of the plug better able to hold the weight/drag of the cable. Whereas when your average molded 5-15 plug is inverted, the smaller amount of material at the hot and neutral pin-end doesn’t prevent the plug from walking away from the wall nearly as well.

    When installed with the ground at the top, the plug is more likely to be exposed to begin with, although if it’s a full moon and black cat crosses your path and you walk under a ladder while breaking a mirror during the apocalypse AND a metal picture frame that happens to be less than 3/8″ thick falls exactly square centered directly above that outlet, it won’t short out, that’s true.

    When I encounter them installed that way, I invert them.

  • Bdmac

    I have never heard such asinine bullshit regarding reversed installation of three prong installations. To think have a pin installed on top would prevent electrical shock is incrediblely ignorant. Does it not occur to the “witless” individual who suggests reversal (pin to top[) cause the electrical plug to be encouraged to fall from the outlet simply because the weight of the cord ‘pulls’ from the top and outward which would encourage the plug/receptacle to dsengage.

    Where do these counter thinking idiots come from. They have to be Democrats.
    bdmac

    • Rmb

      I am and have been a journeyman electrician since 1981,working union and nonunion jobs, commercial and residential jobs, I do know a man who lost his son of 17 years to electrocution. the son was placing an aluminum stepladder behind a chest type freezer in the garage, the thin brace of the ladder contacted the hot blade of the cord behind the freezer. as he was leaning against the freezer he was grounded. he is now dead and buried. ground on bottom. i have replaced many outlets that have been shorted by objects falling across and lodging on blades of plugs. i will not install an outlet with ground pin down. you  take that chance with anothers life and safety.

    • Bob

      You were doing all right until that last asinine statement. Your credibility just vanished.