C&H is Seeking Kitchen Bloggers

kitchen blog white C&H is Seeking Kitchen Bloggers
Do you dream of countertops and cabinets? Appliances and backsplashes? We’re expanding our editorial team and seeking new voices to contribute regularly to our site.
Do you already read Charles & Hudson and would like a place to share your ideas and inspirations with a large community of kitchen remodeling enthusiasts? Do you have professional experience or a deep passion for designing and remodeling kitchens? If this is you, read on for more details.


This is a part-time, paid, freelance position (1-2 posts per day) and it’s great (but not required) if your other gigs plug you into the kitchen design industry in some way. Preferably the candidate already writes their own blog or has previous print writing experience.
Responsibilities include daily/weekly posting of original content.
You need:
+ strong blog-style writing skills
+ a good computer
+ photo editing software
+ a reliable high speed connection
+ a digital camera
+ excellent photography skills
Please submit:
+ Your name
+ Where you live
+ What you do full time
+ What blogs do you read or write
+ 2 sample posts – keep it 200 words maximum and showcase your individual take on a kitchen related bit of news, design or renovation. Please write this sample for Charles & Hudson and refer to this website to get a sense of our style.
Send to: editor@charlesandhudson.com with “C&H KITCHEN BLOGGER” in the subject line of your email.
This is a great opportunity for someone who’s passionate about kitchens and is seeking a prominent platform to share their obsession with others.
photo: Nancy Hugo, CKD

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timothy dahl profile C&H is Seeking Kitchen Bloggers

Timothy Dahl

Founder/EIC at Charles & Hudson
Timothy’s background includes stints at This Old House, ELLE DECOR, Metropolitan Home and Woman’s Day. His work has been published on Wired Design, Bob Vila, DIY Network, The Family Handyman and Popular Mechanics and he has been featured on the Martha Stewart radio show and as a speaker at the ALT Design Summit, K/BIS and the National Hardware Show.
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  • drumpf

    I signed up on Angie’s List and paid their fee. I found reviews of contractors that were 2 years or older. I think one was not even in business anymore or the phone number was wrong. If you sign up for a months, it automatically renews and you get charged for subsequent months, so you have to cancel either by sending them an email or calling. I find that annoying. My opinion is that the site as it is now with having to pay a fee, does not work. They need to find a way to make it free again. The idea behind it good.

    • http://www.charlesandhudson.com Charles & Hudson

      Thanks for sharing your experience with Angie’s List. With such a large database it’s got to be hard to update but there also isn’t much moderation of vendors. The subscriber issues are definitely a pain and we hate companies that make it difficult to unsubscribe. Hope others can share their pros and cons with Angie’s List.

  • ritaro

    I have used Angie’s list for services from tree cutting to plumbing and have yet to be disappointed. The coupons offered by certain companies have always covered the cost of the yearly membership. For me, it is a useful and appreciated service.

  • jmurphy42

    As the owner of a construction company – I am thumbs down on AL. My only three feedbacks were from 1) a client who wrote at a point of natural frustration – 80 percent through a addition/kitchen remodel whom had a few legitimat complaints that were all resolved to 110% – never was communicated on AL. 2) A client who complained about price on a project that was bid at 1/2 the market rate and 3) A mystery feedback from a person who was never in our database as even every leaving a name and number (and we record “EVERY” name and number” who complained that we did not call them back. When I called and wrote to ask Angies List list on how to deal with this my only options were to write a rebuttal (now I am the defensive company) or to recruit my good clients to pay for AL membership so that they can overpower the negative feed back. My clients don’t need Angies List as they have me.

    • http://www.charlesandhudson.com Charles & Hudson

      Great feedback from a contractors point of view. Definitely seems like AL has you in a bind if you choose to place value in the comments. AL really needs the big numbers to make it work effectively.