Inspiring Small Spaces from Loving. Living. Small.

rebecca orlov office Inspiring Small Spaces from Loving. Living. Small.
We’ve been long time advocates for small space living and foresaw the backlash to McMansions that consume more energy, resources and materials than any house should.
Apartment Therapy grew out of a tiny NYC apartment (most are) but their mantra of “saving one room at a time” can apply to any home regardless of size. We even applied the “cure” to our own New York apartment (that’s our kitchen in the photo).
With home design magazines continuing to play catchup, the legion of home design websites continue to gain traction. Loving. Living. Small. from Rebecca Orlov, focuses on “living small with style”.
We asked her for a few tips for living in small spaces and she came back with some great answers!
C&H: What does living small mean to you?
Rebecca: To me, living small doesn’t really have to do with the actual size. It’s more about embracing your own style and being thoughtful about your things. Sometimes stuff is just more stuff and when living small, you have to consider all of your furniture and decor. It makes material items more meaningful.
C&H: I’ve got a big room, can I still apply “living small” themes? How so?
Rebecca: Absolutely! In fact, applying small space solutions to larger rooms will often provide balance and scale to a space that may feel overwhelming and hard to tackle. A few to consider are using:
-Using your walls to go vertical in a space will draw the eye up. Art galleries, tall furniture, shelving – all of these items will work in larger rooms as well and will provide balance in the space.
-Layering furniture is a great way to use your space will create depth in the room. Don’t be afraid to place furniture in front of other furniture. Place matching chairs in front of built-ins or angle a chaise in front of the tv. This also applies to floating your furniture – just because you have walls doesn’t mean you have to place your furniture right against them.
-Consider using furniture with legs. Credenzas, sofas, armoires with longer legs will allow the eye to continue to go past the furniture and the space will appear bigger.
-Painting an accent wall. I often encourage painting one wall in any sized space to create depth and texture. And consider your colors – warm colors will make a (large) space feel more intimate while cool colors can make a room appear to expand. In the case of a large space, go with the warm.


C&H: Your favorite tips for living small?
Rebecca: I definitely have a lot of these but my fave – lighting. No matter how small or big your space is, lighting is one of the best ways to add depth, texture, balance and scale. Placing your lights in certain directions and angles can make a space feel a lot bigger or more intimate. It’s a really affordable way to create a harmonious design style in your small (or big) home.
For more small space inspiration read Rebecca’s blog Love.Living.Small and you should also check out her contributions to Apartment Therapy – LA.

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timothy dahl profile Inspiring Small Spaces from Loving. Living. Small.

Timothy Dahl

Founder/EIC at Charles & Hudson
Timothy’s background includes stints at This Old House, ELLE DECOR, Metropolitan Home and Woman’s Day. His work has been published on Wired Design, Bob Vila, DIY Network, The Family Handyman and Popular Mechanics and he has been featured on the Martha Stewart radio show and as a speaker at the ALT Design Summit, K/BIS and the National Hardware Show.